Largest Measles Outbreak In More Than Ten Years

Photo: Ann Weru/IRIN Child gets immunised against measles, which is more widespread this year in Burkina Faso than it has been for more than 10 years (file photo) via irin

Photo: Ann Weru/IRIN Child gets immunised against measles, which is more widespread this year in Burkina Faso than it has been for more than 10 years (file photo) via irin

The spread of a preventable infection is the largest Measles outbreak in Burkina Faso in over a decade, according to the World Health

Burkina Faso via nationsonline

Burkina Faso via nationsonline

Organization (WHO).

Burkina Faso’s Health Ministry says this year the number of reported infections is more than ten fold the number of infections from 1997 onward.
It says by the first week of April more than 19,000 infections and 150 deaths had been reported.

A global initiative go combat measles says countries that are able to immunize only 80% of their population sustain outbreaks about every three to four years.

But countries that are able to immunize 95% have not reported any outbreaks in recent years.

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3 responses to “Largest Measles Outbreak In More Than Ten Years

  1. Pingback: Largest Measles Outbreak In More Than Ten Years

  2. Not true that countries with 95% immunization have reported no outbreaks. There was one last month in Australia in an area where idiot altmed culture is popular.

  3. Hey Kmccready

    thanks for your comment and for checking out the site! so i looked into your comment, and this is what I found out….

    the measles vaccine is only 85% effective. Which means, to calculate the true coverage of the vaccine, you have to multiply 85% by the reported immunization coverage statistic. So when a government says 80% of the population immunised it really mean only 68% of the population and when it says 95% of the population it means 80%.

    Here is some information that might be helpful in regards to the possible reasons why the World Health Organization released this measles immunisation data.

    weekly epidemiological record

    reported BCG coverage

    reported DTP3 coverage

    joint statement on strategies to reduce measles mortality worldwide

    measles bulletin

    guidelines for epidemic preparedness and response

    In regards to Australia, very good question.

    There was an outbreak in the 90’s and it seems

    This review [By the Australian Government’s Department of Health] has demonstrated that the quality and representativeness of the data collected by the Victorian passive surveillance system is questionable.”

    an additional review

    with highly contagious infection/disease, seems as though immunisation,surveillance, treatment, notification etc. all go hand in hand when it comes to prevention.

    This year a mini outbreak of measles in Queensland was caused by parents not wanting to vaccinate their children. Some parents fear vaccinations can cause autism.

    I think the hardest thing too might be trying to actually define an outbreak…The World Health Organization defines and outbreak as

    “The term “outbreak” is generally used when the number of cases observed is greater that the number
    normally expected in the same geographic area for the same period of time. The definition of an
    “outbreak” will vary according to the phase of measles control. For instance, a single case may
    mark an outbreak in a country aiming at elimination. The occurrence of a measles outbreak in a
    highly immunized population does not necessarily represent a failure of the routine immunization
    program. Investigation of outbreaks provides an opportunity to identify high-risk groups, changes
    in measles epidemiology, weaknesses in the routine immunization programme or in the
    management of measles cases. When an outbreak occurs that has not been predicted, or could not be
    prevented, the response needs to be rapid, since measles is highly infectious and spreads rapidly.”

    Thank you again for your support!

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