US Needs Help From EU to Close Guantanamo

The President of France is accepting an Algerian detainee from Guantanamo. President Nicolas Sarkozy says much more help is needed from European governments.

The US Administration has been asking the European Union to help it shut down Guantanamo.

It says that many of the prisoners who have been cleared, remain at the prison because they fear torture or abuse in their native country, and neither the United States nor a third country has offered them a place to call home. Of the approximately 240 prisoners, 50-60 have told their lawyers they fear going home to countries such as Algeria, Libya, Tunisia and Uzbekistan.

Former detainees from China have been cleared for almost 8 years, and still find themselves in US Custody.

The Five Men from China who were Released via NYT

The Five Men from China who were Released via NYT

Map of Ethnicities in China

Map of Ethnicities in China

In 2006, Albania agreed to take in five people from China, leaving 17  more Uighurs in US custody, as no other country has made a similar offer.

In October 2008, a US federal court noted that attempts to resettle the Uighurs elsewhere had failed and ordered that they be brought to the US.


In February, a federal appeals court overturned the ruling, saying that only the president – and not the courts – could permit the men to enter the US.

Uighur communities and refugee resettlement groups in the US have offered to provide housing, job training, and other support services.

Nury Turkel, a leader in the Uighur-American community, is photographed in his office on Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008, in Washington. With no Dalai Lama to promote their cause, Chinese Muslims known as Uighurs have waged a largely anonymous bid for autonomy and cultural survival in their Central Asian homeland north of Tibet.

Nury Turkel, a leader in the Uighur-American community, is photographed in his office on Thursday, Oct. 9, 2008, in Washington. With no Dalai Lama to promote their cause, Chinese Muslims known as Uighurs have waged a largely anonymous bid for autonomy and cultural survival in their Central Asian homeland north of Tibet.

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